Depression and SHEN Therapy, An Effective Non-Medicinal Solution

Depressive disorders come in different forms, just as is the case with other illnesses such as heart disease. However, within these types there are variations in the number of symptoms, their severity, and persistence.
Major depression is manifested by a combination of symptoms (see symptom list) that interfere with the ability to work, study, sleep, eat, and enjoy once pleasurable activities. Such a disabling episode of depression may occur only once but more commonly occurs several times in a lifetime.

Dysthymia is a less severe type of depression, it involves long-term, chronic symptoms that do not disable, but keep one from functioning well or from feeling good. Many people with dysthymia also experience major depressive episodes at some time in their lives.

Symptoms of Depression:

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in activities that were once enjoyed, including sex
  • Decreased energy, fatigue, being “slowed down”
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering, making decisions
  • Insomnia, early-morning awakening, or oversleeping
  • Appetite and/or weight loss or overeating and weight gain
  • Thoughts of death or suicide; suicide attempts
  • Restlessness, irritability
  • Persistent physical symptoms that do not respond to treatment, such as headaches, digestive disorders, and chronic pain

How SHEN helps depression

SHEN theory operates on the principle that residue of emotional trauma from earlier in life is held deep inside the body where it influences the way we live our lives, and disrupts normal bodily functioning. When an event occurs that is similar to the originating event, it can aggravate the hidden emotions and cause them to flare up, worsening our behavior and exacerbating our physical problems. The painful emotional trauma is trapped in the body by the Auto-Contractile Pain Reflex (ACPR). Our experience with working with depressed people shows that in a great many cases depression is the result of suppressing the emotions of fear, grief, or shame.

SHEN practice is a science-based form of biofield therapeutics that adheres to the physics of the biofield as deduced by Richard R. Pavek. When doing SHEN, we place our hands on your body in a series of precise, polarized locations that are indicated by the particular emotional condition you present and conform to biofield physics. This correctly focuses the qi (ch’i) from our hands so as to release the ACPR contractions trapping the painful emotions. In this way, SHEN safely lifts old, painful emotions to the surface where they disperse and leave. This allows one’s natural joy and enthusiasm to emerge.

In an unfilled (and therefore uncompleted) study of SHEN and Major Depression at the Milwaukee County Mental Health Center, while there was no difference in dismissal rate between the active and control arms of the study, virtually all of those receiving SHEN reported lifting of spirits, rejoining in social interaction change of dreaming from terrifying dreams to peaceful dreams and recovery of at least some emotionality.

From: Assumptive Models and Research in Biofield Therapeutics. Proceedings of the Conference: Examining Research Assumptions in Alternative Medicine, July 1994, Bethesda, Maryland

Additional Information about depression

People who have low self-esteem, who consistently view themselves and the world with pessimism or who are readily overwhelmed by stress, are prone to depression. Whether this represents a psychological predisposition or an early form of the illness is not clear.

Women experience depression about twice as often as men.  Many hormonal factors may contribute to the increased rate of depression in women-particularly such factors as menstrual cycle changes, pregnancy, miscarriage, postpartum period, pre-menopause, and menopause. Many women also face additional stresses such as responsibilities both at work and home, single parenthood, and caring for children and for aging parents. Many women are also particularly vulnerable after the birth of a baby.

Men’s depression is often masked by alcohol or drugs, or by the socially acceptable habit of working excessively long hours. Depression typically shows up in men not as feeling hopeless and helpless, but as being irritable, angry, and discouraged; hence, depression may be difficult to recognize as such in men.
Men and women respond equally to SHEN.

Click here for more information about:

Depression (booklet published by the National Institute of Mental Health),
Emotions,
The Biofield,
ACPR.

Copyright Richard Pavek, SHEN Therapy Institute